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Institute for Health Care Policy and Aging Research
 
 
Cordon Daley
Project L/EARN Intern - 2001
Cordon Daley
Factors Associated with Racial Differences in Disenrollment from New Jersey KidCare
Mentor:
Jane Miller, Ph.D.
Professor
E.J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
 

Cordon Daley graduated from Livingston College at Rutgers University as a Public Health Major in May 2002. Ultimately, Cordon aspires to gain a position as a hospital administrator with a key role in the executive board.

At the time of his internship, he had hopes to mediate the factors impacting the health care access and utilization of the community. He had been especially concerned with minorities and believed that increased representation of minority groups among administrators in the health fields was imperative to effectively recognize and address these issues. Cordon had previously achieved roles such as the President of the Rutgers University Public Health Association (RUPHA) and as a student member of the Highland Park Board of Health. These positions provided Cordon with valuable experience in preparing for such challenging work and his involvement in volunteer programs, including Meals-On-Wheels and youth/peer mentoring programs, which also provided perspective and a basis for his empathy. Cordonís concern with the number of uninsured children in the United States spurred his interest in Dr. Millerís work examining the efficacy of the New Jersey Kidcare program. He had been particularly interested in examining racial disparities in access to and utilization of available programs.

Cordon then stated that he had applied to Project L/EARN as much for the discipline and structure as for its renowned preparation for the rigors of graduate school. He credits the program with an increase in his self-assurance and time-management skills as well as research training. Cordon feels he has learned that commitment and dedication are just as important as the research skills he has acquired.

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