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About Us » Lectures, Seminars & Events:
Upcoming All Events
2/5/2015
Inequality and the American Family: From the View of Dads
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Kathryn Edin
Distinguished Bloomberg Professor, Department of Sociology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University
Thursday, February 05, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Kathryn Edin is one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers using ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews and mixed method approaches to study the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family life and neighborhood contexts. She has taken on key mysteries about the urban poor that have not been fully answered by quantitative work including: How do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work? Why do they end up as single mothers in the first place? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? How have the lives of single mothers changed with welfare reform? Continuing to capitalize on the synergies between survey and qualitative work, her ongoing projects include a study of extreme poverty in the U.S.; the intergenerational transmission of poverty among 150 African American young adults in inner city Baltimore and their parents followed over 17 to 19 years; a study of tradeoffs moderate- and low-income Black, White, and Latino families make when deciding where to live, what kind of place to rent or purchase and where to send their children to school; and a formative study of landlords and the supply side of residential choice for low-income renters.
2/12/2015
Building a Culture of Health": RWJF's New Strategy to Improve Population Health
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Alonzo Plough
Vice President for Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Alonzo Plough, PhD, MPH is Vice President for Research-Evaluation-Learning and Chief Science Officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Dr. Plough will discuss the RWJF’s new grand vision and strategies to create a culture of health for the nation’s diverse population groups. Dr. Plough’s career has spanned academia, government and philanthropy. He was director of public health in Boston with faculty appointments at Boston University, Tufts, and Harvard before becoming director and health officer for the Seattle and King County Department of Public Health and professor of health services at the University of Washington School of Public Health. He was vice president of strategy, planning and evaluation for the California Endowment. Prior to coming to the RWJF, Dr. Plough was director of emergency preparedness and response at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health responsible for leadership and management of public health preparedness activities protecting 10 million residents of Los Angeles County from natural disasters and threats from disease outbreaks and other public health emergencies. Dr. Plough has been at the RWJF since January, 2014.
2/19/2015
Genetic Determinism, Technology Optimism, Race, and Partisanship: Unexpected (and Unexplained) Linkages in Public Attitudes
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Jennifer Hochschild
Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government and Professor of African and African American Studies, Department of Government
Harvard University
Thursday, February 19, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Jennifer L. Hochschild, PhD studies and teaches about the intersection of American politics and political philosophy particularly in the areas of race, ethnicity, and immigration and educational and social welfare policies. She also works on issues in public opinion, political culture, and American political thought. Currently Dr. Hochschild is conducting research on the politics and ideology of genomic science, immigrant political incorporation and citizens’ use of factual information in political decision-making. A forthcoming co-authored book is Do Facts Matter? Information, Misinformation, and Democratic Politics. Recent co-authored books include Outsiders No More? Models of Immigrant Political Incorporation (2013) and Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America (2012). Before coming to Harvard in 2001, Professor Hochschild taught at Duke and Columbia Universities and was William Steward Tod Professor of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University for almost two decades.
2/26/2015
Politics and Evidence in Screening for Depression: a 2015 Update
Brown Bag Seminar Series

James Coyne
Professor of Health Psychology and Visiting Professor
University Medical Center, Groningen, the Netherlands and Rutgers University
Thursday, February 26, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
James Coyne, PhD, is Professor of Health Psychology, University Medical Center, Groningen, the Netherlands and Visiting Professor at the Institute for Health. Dr. Coyne is Emeritus Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania where he was Director of Behavioral Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center and Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. He served as External Scientific Advisor to a decade of European Commission funded community based programs to improve care for depression in the community. He has written over 350 articles and chapters, including systematic reviews of screening for distress and depression in medical settings and classic articles about stress and coping, couples research, and interpersonal aspects of depression. He has been designated by ISI Web of Science as one of the most impactful psychologists and psychiatrists in the world. He blogs and is a regular contributor to the blog Science Based Medicine and to the PLOS One Blog, Mind the Brain. He is known for giving lively, controversial lectures using scientific evidence to challenge assumptions about the optimal way of providing psychosocial care and care for depression to medical patients.
3/24/2015
Numeracy and Health: A Tyranny of Numbers
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Ellen Peters
Professor of Psychology and Director of the Behavioral Decision Making Initiative
Ohio State University
Tuesday, March 24, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Ellen Peters, PhD is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Behavioral Decision Making Initiative at The Ohio State University. She conducts basic and applied research in judgment and decision making. She has worked extensively with the U.S. National Cancer Institute and Food and Drug Administration to advance the science of human decision making as it applies to health and health policy. Dr. Peters focuses on understanding the basic building blocks of human judgment and decision making especially how affective, intuitive and deliberative processes help people to make decisions in an increasingly complex world. She studies decision making as an interaction of characteristics of the decision situation and characteristics of the individual. In applied research, she focuses on risk perception and risk communication in health, financial and environmental contexts including how to present information to facilitate its comprehension and use. Recently, she has been interested in the psychological mechanisms underlying tobacco use and prevention and how to "nudge" people towards healthier behaviors.
3/26/2015
** GLOBAL HEALTH SYMPOSIUM ** Latino Immigrant Health over the Life Course: Social, Cultural, and Economic Influences
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Jacqueline Angel
Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology
University of Texas, LBJ School of Public Affairs and Department of Sociology
Deborah Carr
Professor
Department of Sociology, Rutgers University
Karen D'Alonzo
Associate Professor
School of Nursing, Rutgers University
Peter Guarnaccia
Professor
IHHCPAR and Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers University

Nancy Reichman
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 12:00 pm-2:00 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
A multidisciplinary team of scholars will discuss health disparities, health behaviors, and access to health care among Latino immigrants in the United States. The four speakers are internationally recognized scholars of global health, with a particular emphasis on the ways that Latino immigrants’ cultural practices, social relations, neighborhood characteristics, and legal and/or economic obstacles affect their health and access to care. Drs. Angel, D’Alonzo, and Reichman will each focus on a distinct stage of the life span: old age, adulthood, and childhood/adolescence, respectively. Dr. Guarnaccia will highlight the ways that medical training in cultural competence may contribute to the overall health and well-being of Latino immigrant children, adults, and elders in the United States. Dr. Carr will serve as moderator and will provide a brief overview of the demography of Latino immigration to the United States in the 21st century.
4/16/2015
Is 50 the New 80? Health, Pain, Suicide, and Age
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Anne Case
Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Professor of Economics and Public Affairs
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Economics Department Princeton University
Angus Deaton
Dwight D Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Princeton University
Thursday, April 16, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Anne Case, PhD is Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Department of Economics, Princeton University. Dr. Case is Director of the Research Program in Development Studies and a Faculty Fellow in two research centers, the Center for Health and Wellbeing and the Office of Population Research at the Woodrow Wilson School. Dr. Case’s long-standing research examines the interrelationships among economics, health issues and societal factors both domestically and in South Africa.

Angus S. Deaton, PhD is Dwight D Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs and Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Department of Economics, Princeton University. One of the world's leading development economists, his research on health, wellbeing and economic development focuses on social determinants of health, how people's incomes, their education and the characteristics of the societies in which they live, affect their health status and life chances. His recent book, THE GREAT ESCAPE: Health, Wealth and the Origins of Inequality is “the story of mankind’s escaping from deprivation and early death”, but not for all.
4/23/2015
Poster Session
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Thursday, April 23, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
The poster session will highlight research of Institute for Health faculty, research staff, postdoctoral fellows and students. In addition to enhancing awareness of many fine and innovative research projects underway, the session will provide opportunities for discussion among Institute members, affiliates and interested others. A light lunch will be served.
4/30/2015
Ecological Momentary Tobacco Control
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Thomas Kirchner
Research Investigator
Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies, American Legacy Foundation
Thursday, April 30, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Thomas R Kirchner, PhD is Research Investigator at the Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies and adjunct assistant professor at the Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and in the Department of Oncology, Georgetown University Medical Center at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Kirchner’s work focuses on understanding health-related behavior and decision-making notably the momentary influences on the maintenance of addictive and health-related behavior utilizing both field-based (ecological momentary assessment) and laboratory-based methodologies. A primary focus is the use of mobile devices to capture the multilevel interface between individuals and their momentary circumstances in time and place. Current projects are beginning to uncover the social and environmental determinants of tobacco use initiation, maintenance and cessation.
Upcoming Events :
2/5/2015, 12:00 pm
Inequality and the American Family: From the View of Dads
Kathryn Edin
 
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