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Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Medical Care: The Evidence and Implications for Policy and Research

H. Jack Geiger will speak at the Institute on Tuesday, April 9, 2002 from 10:00 am - 12:00 noon. H. Jack Geiger, MD, ScD (hon), is the Arthur C Logan Professor Emeritus of Community Medicine, City University of New York (CUNY) Medical School; a founding member and Past President of the Committee for Health in Southern Africa (CHISA); a founding member and Past President of Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), which shared in the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1998; and a founding member and Past President of Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), the US affiliate of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War which received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1985. Dr. Geiger's work in human rights spans more than five decades and includes serving as a founding member of one of the first chapters of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and Civil Liberties Chair of the American Veterans Committee, leading campaigns to end racial discrimination in hospital care and admission to medical schools.

Most of Dr. Geiger's professional career has been devoted to the problems of health, poverty, and human rights. He initiated the community health center model in the U.S., combining community-oriented primary care, public health interventions, and civil rights and community empowerment and development initiatives, and was a leader in the development of the national health center network of more than 800 urban, rural, and migrant centers currently serving some nine million low-income patients. From 1965-71, he was Co-Director and then Director of the first urban and first rural health centers in the U.S., at Columbia Point, Boston, and Mound Bayou, Mississippi.

As lunch will be served, please RSVP to Fran Teeple (732) 932-8413 or fteeple@ihhcpar.rutgers.edu by Wednesday, April 3, 2002.




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